Botox & Fillers before and after

Botox & Fillers before and after, What are dermal fillers?

The four major structural components of our face are skin, fat, muscle, and bone. As we age, volume loss in these structures contributes to many of the visible signs of aging. Dermal fillers may help.

Over time, age-related bone loss in the face can lead to retraction of the jawline, descent of the nose, and loss of high cheekbones. The facial muscles also decrease in volume and elasticity, and deflation and movement of facial fat further accentuates the signs of aging. Finally, the skin stretches and loses elasticity — compounded by the loss of scaffolding provided by fat, muscle, and bone, this leads to wrinkles, sagging skin, and other familiar signs of aging.

Dermal fillers, an injectable treatment performed in a doctor’s office, can help smooth lines and replenish lost volume, restoring a more youthful appearance.

Dermal fillers are soft, gel-like substances that are injected under the skin. They can address a number of common concerns including smoothing of deep under-eye circles, lifting of cheekbones, volumization of the lips, smoothing of lip lines and nasolabilal folds (the creases that run from the side of the nose to the corners of the mouth), and rejuvenation of the hands.

Dermal fillers can be composed of a variety of substances, some naturally occurring and some synthetic. One of the most common compounds used in dermal fillers is hyaluronic acid (HA). HA is a naturally occurring substance found in our skin, and it plays a major role in keeping skin hydrated and volumized. HA fillers, depending on their specific chemical makeup, can last from six months to much longer before being gradually absorbed by the body.

One of the main benefits of HA fillers, aside from their natural appearance when injected, is that they can be dissolved by a special solution in case of an adverse event, or if the person dislikes the appearance. Also, most HA fillers are premixed with lidocaine, a numbing agent, to maximize comfort during treatment.

Other available dermal fillers include those made from calcium hydroxylapatite, poly-L-lactic acid, polymethyl methacrylate, and autologous fat (fat that is transplanted from another part of your body). Calcium hydroxylapatite is a mineral-like compound naturally found in human bones. It has been used in dentistry and reconstructive plastic surgery for years with a long track-record of safety. Poly-L-lactic acid is a synthetic filler that helps to stimulate collagen production. This filler is different from other fillers because its results are gradual; volumization occurs over several months as it stimulates the body to produce collagen. Polymethyl methacrylate is a semi-permanent filler. While it is more durable compared to other more readily biodegradable fillers, it has potential complications such as forming lumps or being visible under the skin.

Are dermal fillers safe? 

 Dermal fillers are considered to be safe but side effects can occur. A licensed healthcare professional should perform all dermal filler procedures using only FDA-approved fillers injected with a syringe. The most common problems include: skin rash, itching, or pimple-like eruptions. 

Botox derives from C. botulinum bacteria, which are present in many natural settings, including soil, lakes, forests, and the intestinal tracts of mammals and fish. 

Naturally occurring C. botulinum bacteria and spores are generally harmless. Problems only arise when the spores transform and the cell population increases. At a certain point, the bacteria begin producing Botulinum toxin, the deadly neurotoxin responsible for botulism. 

Botulinum toxin is extremely dangerous. Some scientists have estimated that 1 gramTrusted Source of a crystalline form of the toxin could kill 1 million people and that a couple of kilograms could kill every human on the planet. 

However, when Botox is appropriately used in a therapeutic context, it is safe and has few side effects, the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology report. 

Manufacturers make Botox injections with very small doses of Botulinum toxin. The drug can temporarily paralyze muscles, which can benefit people with various muscle or nerve disorders. 

Commercial preparations of Botulinum toxin include: 

  • onabotulinumtoxin A (aquashine br soft filler 2ml online
  • abobotulinumtoxin A (Dysport) 
  • incobotulinumtoxin A (Xeomin) 
  • rimabotulinumtoxin B (Myobloc) 
  • prabotulinumtoxin A (Jeuveau) 

People casually use the term “Botox” to describe all of these products, though Botox is a registered trademark that one company owns. 

How does it work? 

Botox is a neurotoxin. These substances target the nervous system, disrupting the nerve signaling processes that stimulate muscle contraction. This is how the drug causes temporary muscle paralysis. 

In order for any muscle to contract, the nerves release a chemical messenger called acetylcholine at the junction where nerve endings meet muscle cells. Acetylcholine attaches to receptors on the muscle cells and causes the cells to contract, or shorten. 

Botox injections prevent the release of acetylcholine, which stops the muscle cells from contracting. In this way, the toxin helps the muscles to become less stiff. 

How can I prepare for fillers?

A week prior to your treatment, avoid taking aspirin, ibuprofen, vitamin E and fish oil supplements as these may increase bleeding and bruising. However, if you are taking any prescribed medicines, including aspirin, do not stop taking them. Instead, chat with your practitioner or GP first.

Avoiding alcohol for at least one day before your treatment is also recommended.

Q. Is there anything I should avoid after fillers?

Try not to touch the treated areas immediately after your anti-ageing treatment as this can lead to infection or interfere with the placement of filler. Exercise, alcohol and heat should be avoided for the first couple of days after the treatment and you should wait 1-2 weeks before having any other aesthetic treatments.

Q. Who is not a suitable candidate for fillers?

You shouldn’t have a filler treatment if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, if you’re allergic to any of the ingredients in the filler, or if your skin is irritated or infected.

Your practitioner will be able to give you further guidance on this.

Botox & Fillers before and after

Botox & Fillers before and after
Botox & Fillers before and after 01

How can I prepare for fillers?

A week prior to your treatment, avoid taking aspirin, ibuprofen, vitamin E and fish oil supplements as these may increase bleeding and bruising. However, if you are taking any prescribed medicines, including aspirin, do not stop taking them. Instead, chat with your practitioner or GP first.

Avoiding alcohol for at least one day before your treatment is also recommended.

Q. Is there anything I should avoid after fillers?

Try not to touch the treated areas immediately after your anti-ageing treatment as this can lead to infection or interfere with the placement of filler. Exercise, alcohol and heat should be avoided for the first couple of days after the btx aquashine treatment and you should wait 1-2 weeks before having any other aesthetic treatments.

Q. Who is not a suitable candidate for fillers?

You shouldn’t have a filler treatment if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding, if you’re allergic to any of the ingredients in the filler, or if your skin is irritated or infected.

Your practitioner will be able to give you further guidance on this.

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